Archive of ‘Figurative’ category

Hiding in Plain Sight. Flora Borsi

It can be so easy to push what we are or what we’re feeling back into the depths.  Everyday life necessitates that we “get on with it” and we genuinely want to.  But not being real with ourselves and with the people around us leads to surface relationships in which we just can’t be real.  This series by Hungarian artist Flora Borsi beautifully seems to illustrate the struggle to balance self protection and vulnerability.

Flora Borsi | artsy forager #art #artists #photography #contemporaryart Flora Borsi | artsy forager #art #artists #photography #contemporaryart v Flora Borsi | artsy forager #art #artists #photography #contemporaryart Flora Borsi | artsy forager #art #artists #photography #contemporaryart

 

We need those people in our lives we can get real with.  The ones that will cry with us, listen to us, laugh us through the weeping.  Maybe we think no one else will understand our struggle.  But if we never give them the chance, how will we know?

Borsi mixes photographic elements with painting techniques to create these emotionally charged images.  To see more of Flora Borsi‘s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via I Need a Guide.

Tumbling On: Leah Yerpe

Sometimes it feels as if we are simply tumbling through life, being swayed to and fro like a pinball or a tumbleweed.  In these incredible large scale drawings, Brooklyn artist Leah Yerpe multiplies her figures as they spill through the air.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Yerpe9 Yerpe detail Yerbe_aquila Yerbe_Ceyx Yerbe_phoenicis

 

Placing her figures on a blank background, we lose any sense of situation, leaving them to float through the air as if caught in a tornado, hurtling down toward the ground.  There’s a sense of a loss of control, yet the faces are calm and peaceful– though the winds blow, they simple let themselves be carried.

To see more of the work of Leah Yerpe, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.  Artist found via I Need a Guide.

Aqua Therapy: Carol O’Malia

It hardly feels like summer.  Here on the Northern Cali coast, the temps have barely ever gotten out of the sixties– I’m still wearing scarves and boots on occasion!  In addition to the cooler weather, Mr. F and I both seem to be having trouble getting into a relaxed summer vibe these days.  There always seems to be something on the agenda, something to be done, something to plan, somewhere to go.  I feel like we’re missing out a bit on the carefree feeling that summer brings, but these paintings by Massachusetts artist Carol O’Malia bring me that much closer.

Carol O'Malia | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart #summer Carol O'Malia | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart #summer Carol O'Malia | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart #summer Carol O'Malia | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart #summer Carol O'Malia | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart #summer

Any time we’re able to get to the beach, a river or waterfall, any body of water, really, and I see the ripples sparkling in the sun, my mind instantly relaxes and calms.  O’Malia really captures the radiance of summer light, not just sunlight, but the way we feel more effervescent in summer.  I’m still waiting for that weightless feeling, forgetting everything that’s  happening in the world and just soak it all in.  I hope it comes soon.

To see more of Carol O’Malia’s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

Spiro-Graphics: Kim Kirk Nielsen

Tell me you remember Spirographs? That ubiquitous toy that combined the worlds of math and art and captured the imagination of many an artsy kid.  Danish born, Paris based artist Kim Kirk Nielsen adds his own spriroriffic drawings to appropriated imagery, adding graphic punch and curves in all the right places.

Kim Kirk Nielsen | artsy forager #art #artists #mixedmedia #contemporaryart Kim Kirk Nielsen | artsy forager #art #artists #mixedmedia #contemporaryart Kim Kirk Nielsen | artsy forager #art #artists #mixedmedia #contemporaryart Kim Kirk Nielsen | artsy forager #art #artists #mixedmedia #contemporaryart Kim Kirk Nielsen | artsy forager #art #artists #mixedmedia #contemporaryart

 

I love the way Nielsen is using these spherical forms to emphasize certain areas of each image, as well as playing with scale as in the last piece to create a surreal, dreamlike scene.  The Fibonacci like spirals that echo the patterns of lace doilies ( an ongoing theme in Nielsen’s work ) provide an interesting graphic foil to the photographs he’s chosen to manipulate.  That’s it, I’m going to track down a Spirograph and start drawing all over everything!

To see more of Kim Kirk Nielsen‘s work, please visit his website.

Images found via the artist’s website and his Saatchi Online portfolio.  Artist found via Saatchi Online.

Dream States: Marie Rosen

Mr. Forager and I love to share dreams.  I’m not just talking about the speculative, what if, kind of dreams, but the productions put on by our subconscious while we’re sleeping.  If either of us has an interesting or unusual dream, we always share it.  The work of Belgian artist Marie Rosen has the same surreal, things are not quite what they seem feeling, so often found in our dreams.

Marie Rosen | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marie Rosen | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marie Rosen | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marie Rosen | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marie Rosen | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

Flat planes and barren landscapes defy reality and keep us from knowing for certain how the elements of each piece fit together– landings leading to nowhere, tiny feet gather beneath a giant covered table.  It’s that same incongruity that so often leads us feeling out of sorts following a particularly vivid dream.  Things seem almost real, yet we know they are only imaginings.

To see more of Marie Rosen‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.  Artist found via Art Hound.

Summer Lovin’: Elizabeth Lennie

Summer is officially here!  ‘Tis the season we take to the water!  Perhaps as an escape from the heat, but even more so, we are drawn to watery places this time of year because of the calming effect of water upon our souls and spirits.  In summer, we give ourselves permission to pause and it’s tough to be stressed and harried when gazing out over the ocean’s horizon.  Toronto artist Elizabeth Lennie captures the way summer draws us to the water and out of our depths.

Elizabeth Lennie | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #summer #contemporaryart Elizabeth Lennie | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #summer #contemporaryart Elizabeth Lennie | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #summer #contemporaryart Elizabeth Lennie | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #summer #contemporaryart Elizabeth Lennie | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #summer #contemporaryart

 

While Lennie’s portfolio is filled with more typical watery palettes of blues and greens, it was to these warmer pieces that I found myself most drawn.  Something about these peachy tones reminded me so much of the slowing down we do in the summer time.  Perhaps they recall the glow of sunset over a day spent in nothing but play, with no plans to stop any time soon.  A day when we let ourselves linger, whether on the beach or simply over dinner on the patio at home, we relish relaxation in summer, a lesson we could all carry over into every other season.

To see more of Elizabeth Lennie‘s work, please visit her website.  Mr. Forager & I have lots of waterside backpacking and camping planned for this summer.  How are you relaxing this summer?

All images are via the artist’s website.

 

Artsy Lately: Lee Price

This artist’s work always gets me.  Not just because it’s incredibly gorgeous and highly skilled, it is.  But each piece is filled with so much emotion and narrative, it’s like a beautiful punch in the gut.  I first featured the paintings ( that’s right, paintings!! ) of Lee Price way back in January 2012 while I was writing Artist Watch posts for Escape Into Life.  The work effected me so much that it took another three months before I could write a full feature for the blog.

Lee Price | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Lee Price | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Lee Price | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Lee Price | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Lee Price | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

These new pieces are similar to Price’s older work, in that we still see isolated women in the bed or bath, but the work has evolved to either a more positive or more sinister perspective, depending on your interpretation.  We still seem to see a woman in struggle, yet these seem much more subversive.  Instead of a woman surrounded by the detritus of a cupcake binge, instead, we’re confronted with women enveloped by artificial representations of treats or even more telling, an empty bowl.

We have such a powerful relationship with the food and drink we consume.  It literally has the power to nourish or destroy.  And in the world of fast, highly processed food and GMOs, the choice of what we eat has never seemed more fraught with danger.

To see more of Lee Price‘s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.

Jesus Leguizamo

I’ve been seeing a lot of articles pop up lately on the importance of our online profile photos.  It seems that we make snap judgements about the people we see online based solely on facial expression in profile photos ( duh? ).  In his paintings, Colombian artist Jesus Leguizamo obscures the faces of his subjects, blurring all expression.  There seems to be a trend in art and photography of obstructing faces.. in these days of status updates and selfies, are we all just sick of ourselves?

Jesus Leguizamo | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Jesus Leguizamo | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Jesus Leguizamo | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Jesus Leguizamo | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Jesus Leguizamo | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

In some of Leguizamo’s work, the faces are completely obliterated, leaving nothing but what’s left of the figure to clue us in as to who they are.  In others, the result is a bit more haunting, as we see just enough expression to leave us wanting to know more.

In all the social media swirling around us, it’s tempting to want to put it all out there, to share with the world everything we’re doing and thinking.. and it seems there is a Pavlovian type effect that happens when we do.  Sharing and getting a response makes us want to do more. But when do we cross the line over into sharing too much?  Is it best to lay it all out for the world to see or retain a bit of mystery?

To see more of Jesus Leguizamo‘s work, please visit his website and his portfolio on Saatchi Art.

Second image via the artist’s website.  All other images via Saatchi Art.

Associated Memory: Lindsay Stripling

In a lot of ways, our lives themselves are made up only of memories.  Whether our own memories or the remembrances people have of us, those recollections make up the way we others see us and the way we perceive ourselves.  In her gouache paintings, San Francisco artist Lindsay Stripling emphasizes memory and perceived realities.
Lindsay Stripling | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings Lindsay Stripling | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings Lindsay Stripling | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings Lindsay Stripling | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings Lindsay Stripling | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings

Taking inspiration from vintage photographs, Stripling’s portraits represent an entrance into another world, perhaps a reality or memory different from our own.  It’s funny how, you can never have visited a place, yet have a feeling of it merely from associations like film, photographs or stories.  How often have we found ourselves in a spot, knowing consciously we’d never been there before, yet having an unshakeable feeling of familiarity?

Memories of our loved ones can be much the same, over time, our associations may change, changing our perceptions and skewing our memories.  Our memories are sifted through a giant sieve, so that only the strongest impressions survive.

To see more of Lindsay Stripling‘s work, please visit her website.  Lindsay has several pieces currently for sale on the Buy Some Damn Art website– make sure to check them out!

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via Buy Some Damn Art.

Fogged In: David Ryle

There are so many things I’d never experienced before living on the West Coast.  In Florida, I don’t think I ever experienced “marine layer“, these air masses create the most beautiful foggy formations above the coastal waters.  Of course, everyone loves bright, clear skies, but there is a mysterious beauty to life seen through a fogged lens.  In his Steam Portraits series, photographer David Ryle creates these sensitive captures of portraits seen through or looking through a curtain of steam.

David Ryle | artsy forager #art #artists #photography David Ryle | artsy forager #art #artists #photography David Ryle | artsy forager #art #artists #photography David Ryle | artsy forager #art #artists #photography Ryle_Steam_Glasses_0402

 

We all have our days when it feels like we’re moving through the fog.  Bogged down, without a clear vision of the road ahead.  What’s so lovely about these portraits is that although the subjects are seen gazing through the vapor, in most cases much of the haze is already depleted.  There is something incredibly hopeful in that– to know that although we may be temporarily socked in, slowly, surely, the fog will lift and all will be revealed.

To see more of David Ryle‘s work, please visit his website.

 

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via I Need a Guide.

1 2 3 21