Archive of ‘Sculpture’ category

Spun. Nike Schroeder.

Some people find horizontal lines soothing.  Maybe I’m weird, but I almost always prefer vertical lines.  Perhaps a nod to the soaring peaks of the mountains I love so much?  Textile artist Nike Schroeder takes full advantage of verticality in her string sculptures and I can’t get enough of them.

Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles

The tactile quality of the string and the way it hangs seems to give a nod in my eye to indigenous garments and weavings.  There is also an intriguing sense of color field painting to each piece, as the individual string colors shift gradually, almost imperceptibly to create depth, line and shadow.  The nature lover in me sees moss silently drooping in fog, a waterfall cascading over a cliffside.  Silent representations of a world of life.

To see more of Nike Schroeder’s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via The Jealous Curartor for The Fig House with Emily Henderson.

In Pieces. Dean West + Nathan Sawaya

As we get back into the swing of normal life following our week in the wild, I’ve been struck by the obvious artificiality that surrounds so much of our landscape.  Plastic flowers where real should be, fountains instead of waterfalls.  In their In Pieces series, photographer Dean West and Nathan Sawaya present highly stylized, manipulated representations of modern life.

Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography

 

Upon first glance, these may appear as simple photographs, just as that strip mall facade from a distance might appear to be a row of historic buildings.  But on closer inspection, we see that these are carefully crafted tableaus combining West’s photography with Sawaya’s LEGO sculptures to create an unreal reality. ( click on each image to enlarge the photo and see the LEGO elements better ).

To see more from the In Pieces series, please visit the collection website.  You can check out more work from Dean West here and Nathan Sawaya here.

All images via the In Pieces website.

Sidelined. Klara Glosova

Its nearly that time of year when the light fades earlier and families spend their evenings and weekends cheering their little ones from the sidelines.  My younger brother was big into t-ball, then baseball when he was young, so I clocked a lot of time on bleacher benches.  Seasoned soccer mom and Seattle artist Klara Glosova captures those familiar views of life, as seen from the sidelines.

Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #sculptures #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #sculptures #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

Her paintings and small figurative sculptures are the evidence of careful observation, capturing moments of casual conversation, close attention, and the distraction that comes with hours spent watching the action on the field.  We see the figures and light shift, signaling the passing of time, not just on the field, but for each season in each life.

To see more of Klara Glosova‘s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website and the website of her representing gallery, Bryan Ohno Gallery.

Soft Geometry. Ruth Hiller

It feels like such a hard world these days, doesn’t it?  It can be a challenge to find a bit of softness.  Colorado artist Ruth Hiller juxtaposes industrially crafted plywood with brightly colored organic beeswax, creating a happy softness among the hard edges.

Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

 

I love the kind of California-surfer-cool vibe to these.  The summery colors against the wood grain have a mod, beach house feel.  The graphic nature also seems to nod to visual identifiers like signs and flags.  Whatever wave she is riding, sign me up!

To see more of Ruth Hiller‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website and Facebook page.

Splendor in the Glass. Amber Cowan

I have a soft spot for vintage pressed glass.  My grandmother had tons and in a few boxes in storage somewhere, I have my own collection of milk glass.  So when I spotted the work of Philadelphia artist Amber Cowan, I was immediately in love.

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Cowan creates her magical sculptures from a process of flameworking, blowing, and hot-sculpting thrifted American pressed glass.  The most amazing form of creative upcycling!  With its tightly bunched flora and peek-a-boo fauna, Cowan’s work takes on a wonderfully gothic, fairy tail-like effect, like intricate illustrations come to life.

To see more of Amber Cowan‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

Shapes Surrounding. Joshua Abarbanel

Whenever Mr. F and I go hiking or beach walking, I get a sore neck.  That might seem a bit weird, but it’s really not when you learn that I spend a lot of time looking down.  Not just because of my klutzy tendencies, but because of all the amazing shapes and patterns to be found beneath our feet.  California artist Joshua Abarbanel fashions incredible wood sculptures inspired by nature’s forms and shapes.

Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

 

Abarbanel uses a mix of technology, mechanical tools, and handiwork to craft these amazing sculptures.  The way all the elements fit together seems perfectly in sync, a delicate balance like the life on a coral reef or gears of a clock.

To see more of the work of Joshua Abarbanel, please visit his website.  His work can currently be seen at Hinge Parallel in Culver City, CA.

All images are via the artist’s website.

Broken: Sandra Shashou

I’ve always been drawn to the imperfect.. the broken shell on the beach, the scratched and worn kitchen table.  There is something poetic in the brokenness.  In her sculptural series Broken, London artist Sandra Shashou intentionally breaks beautiful pieces of fine china, the broken pieces becoming a part of a new whole.

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It must be at once heartbreaking and cathartic to smash these lovely things to pieces!  But perfection isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be ( pun intended, ha! ).  Instead of collecting dust in a china cabinet or waiting for a buyer in an antique shop, these pieces are given not just a second chance, but are transformed into a completely new object.  May we all be so lucky!

To see more of Sandra Shashou‘s work, please visit her website.

Images via the artist’s website and Saatchi Online portfolio.

Sucre Doux! Osamu Watanabe

Mr. Forager and I have begun a little tradition while here in Eureka.  Each Tuesday and Thursday evening, we take a very long walk up a few steep hills to a local bakery where we reward ourselves with a sweet treat.  We realize we’re probably undoing some of the good we’ve just done, but without the reward, the journey isn’t nearly as pleasant.  What is it about sweets that make them seem such thrill?  Japanese artist Osamu Watanabe plays with my sweet tooth with his delectable dessert inspired sculptures.

Osamu Watanabe | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

Osamu Watanabe | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

Osamu Watanabe | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

Osamu Watanabe | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Osamu Watanabe | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

 

Watanabe’s mum was a confectionary school teacher, so it’s only natural he would find his muse among the memories of his childhood.  His sculptures are created from modeling paste and wax, shaped into familiar confectionary forms.  He gives us an array of visual treats to rival any bakery case and even better, these delights are calorie free!

To see more of Osamu Watanabe‘s work, please visit his website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

Detritus Reformed: Aurora Robson

Whenever we’re out hiking, one of our pet peeves is spotting trash and debris in wild places.  We inevitably come across a bit of litter no matter where we happen to be exploring and always try to do our best to pick up what we can.  Yet we all consume and discard so much every day without even thinking.  Multi-media artist Aurora Robson transforms plastic debris into beautiful, life-like structures.
Aurora Robson | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Aurora Robson | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Aurora Robson | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Aurora Robson | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Aurora Robson | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryartIn Robson’s hands, plastic pieces of detritus like those that litter the oceans morph into sea creature like beings, similar to those life forms whose very existence is endangered by the debris.  The material gives the sculptures a graceful, ethereal quality, belying the perilous threat posed by their very existence.

To see more of Aurora Robson‘s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.

 

Unfolding Ourselves: Marcelo Daldoce

Two artist posts in one day?!  I know I don’t usually do this, but when I saw this artist’s work on Booooooom! I just couldn’t wait until next week to share it with you.  Mostly self-taught New York artist Marcelo Daldoce creates these absolutely incredible folded watercolor paintings in which the figure hides and reveals itself through the artist’s manipulation of his surface.

Marcelo Daldoce | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marcelo Daldoce | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marcelo Daldoce | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marcelo Daldoce | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marcelo Daldoce | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

From his artist statement, “My work focuses on the terrain beyond the conventional two-dimensional landscape of paper and canvas. In bringing to life a flat surface, I strive to create a puzzle between what is real and what is illusion..”  Isn’t it interesting how we tend to do this for ourselves, folding in and hiding the parts of us we don’t what others to see, manipulating our own surface so that we only reveal a studied portrait of the person we’d like everyone else to assume we are.  I’d like to be more transparent, to unfold my own portrait so that I’m no longer hiding any part of me.  So that what you see is what is me.

To see more of Marcelo Daldoce‘s work, please visit his website.

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via Booooooom.

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