Archive of ‘Sculpture’ category

Broken. Brian Rochefort.

When my mom was diagnosed with ovarian cancer last year, I kept coming back to a photograph I had taken of a sand dollar that summer.  You see, when we were growing up, my mom had a thing for seashells and sand dollars.  She loved hunting for those little treasures on our Florida beaches and our house was filled with them.  The sand dollar from my California beach was beautifully bleached and perfectly round, but with a gaping hole in its center.  For me, the sand dollar was my mom– her beauty and grace was intact but her shell was broken.

Brian Rochefort | artsy forager #art #artists #sculptureWhen faced with the mortality of our parents, it drives home our own vulnerability.  In my mom’s weakness and helplessness, I saw my own– how scared I was sometimes to be alone with her, fearful that something could happen and I wouldn’t know what to do for her.  Next to losing her, it was my biggest fear.  Not being enough.  Not being able.

One particularly weak day, she wasn’t doing well and had taken herself into the bathroom.  I didn’t hear any noises out of the ordinary, but when I came in a few minutes later to check on her, she was on the bathroom floor.  Thankfully not hurt in any way, but so weak that she couldn’t lift herself up.  And I wasn’t strong enough to lift her from the floor.  We tried and tried, but even together we couldn’t do it.  I was afraid of hurting her and she was afraid of me getting hurt trying to lift her.  So we called my stepdad and we waited.  For what seemed like an eternity.

Brian Rochefort | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture

Brian Rochefort | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture

We both shed a lot of tears that day.  Most of mine came when I was back at my brother’s house, alone before the rest of the family came home.  The weight of what could have happened came down on me, along with a tremendous feeling of relief and thankfulness that what could have happened– didn’t.  But it had been there in that moment, more so than any other I spent with her, that I felt how vulnerable she was, how much this ugly disease had broken her beautiful shell.

Brian Rochefort | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture
Brian Rochefort | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture

She’s doing better these days.  Still fighting this beast with all the strength her now tiny body can muster.  When we talk she sounds more like herself than she has in months.  I hear a hope in her voice and it gives me hope, a feeling that has sometimes eluded me through this process.  As impossibly difficult as it has been, she has not let it break her.  Her shell is different, but her spirit is still the same.

Ceramic cups featured today are by Los Angeles based artist Brian Rochefort.  I found an incredible beauty in their cracked and broken shells.  To see more of Brian’s work, please visit his website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

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Configurations. Sophie Smallhorn.

Who remembers the Rubik’s Cube sensation back in the 80s?  I can distinctly remember spending hours twisting and turning, trying to line up all those little colored squares!  I always thought the more random arrangement of colors much more interesting than the neatly lined up hues.  These sculptures by London artist Sophie Smallhorn how much more interesting things can be when we allow for a bit of disarray.

Sophie Smallhorn | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Sophie Smallhorn | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Sophie Smallhorn | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Sophie Smallhorn | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Sophie Smallhorn | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture

 

A life where all is neat and orderly, all black and white, in which we can easily answer any question with this is wrong and this is right is one hardly worth talking about, is it?  It is in the missing pieces, in the gaps between where we may not find answers, but will likely find understanding.

To see more of Sophie Smallhorn‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

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Dimensions. Hilary Harnischfeger.

It can be easy to get stuck pigeon-holing people into the roles in which we know them best.  Mother, father, sister, brother, doctor, lawyer, artist.  But we aren’t flat and one-dimensional.  We are made up of many sides, many layers– some complementary to each other, others contradictory.  When we think of abstraction, for me at least, my mind automatically runs to painting.  But, as the work of Hilary Harnishfeger shows, abstraction can move past the dimensional limits of a painting on canvas.

Hilary Harnischfeger | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Hilary Harnischfeger | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Hilary Harnischfeger | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Hilary Harnischfeger | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture Hilary Harnischfeger | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture

 

Harnischfeger’s work feels to me like what happens when we peel open the layers of a person we’ve never attempted to understand outside the box we’ve placed them in.  All of sudden, we begin to see a world opened up– dreams and interests we could have never imagined because we never took the time to ask.  It’s so easy to take that flatness for granted, to not bother to think beyond it.  And on the other side, it can be difficult to let those dimensions be seen.  It’s less risky to just settle into and reveal ourselves in only that one role.  What if, when we turn ourselves around, we find it was all just a facade?

To see more of Hilary Harnischfeger‘s work, please visit the website of Rachel Uffner Gallery.

All images via the Rachel Uffner Gallery website.

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Spun. Nike Schroeder.

Some people find horizontal lines soothing.  Maybe I’m weird, but I almost always prefer vertical lines.  Perhaps a nod to the soaring peaks of the mountains I love so much?  Textile artist Nike Schroeder takes full advantage of verticality in her string sculptures and I can’t get enough of them.

Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles Nike Schroeder | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #textiles

The tactile quality of the string and the way it hangs seems to give a nod in my eye to indigenous garments and weavings.  There is also an intriguing sense of color field painting to each piece, as the individual string colors shift gradually, almost imperceptibly to create depth, line and shadow.  The nature lover in me sees moss silently drooping in fog, a waterfall cascading over a cliffside.  Silent representations of a world of life.

To see more of Nike Schroeder’s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via The Jealous Curartor for The Fig House with Emily Henderson.

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In Pieces. Dean West + Nathan Sawaya

As we get back into the swing of normal life following our week in the wild, I’ve been struck by the obvious artificiality that surrounds so much of our landscape.  Plastic flowers where real should be, fountains instead of waterfalls.  In their In Pieces series, photographer Dean West and Nathan Sawaya present highly stylized, manipulated representations of modern life.

Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography Dean West + Nathan Sawaya | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #photography

 

Upon first glance, these may appear as simple photographs, just as that strip mall facade from a distance might appear to be a row of historic buildings.  But on closer inspection, we see that these are carefully crafted tableaus combining West’s photography with Sawaya’s LEGO sculptures to create an unreal reality. ( click on each image to enlarge the photo and see the LEGO elements better ).

To see more from the In Pieces series, please visit the collection website.  You can check out more work from Dean West here and Nathan Sawaya here.

All images via the In Pieces website.

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Sidelined. Klara Glosova

Its nearly that time of year when the light fades earlier and families spend their evenings and weekends cheering their little ones from the sidelines.  My younger brother was big into t-ball, then baseball when he was young, so I clocked a lot of time on bleacher benches.  Seasoned soccer mom and Seattle artist Klara Glosova captures those familiar views of life, as seen from the sidelines.

Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #sculptures #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #sculptures #contemporaryart Klara Glosova | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

Her paintings and small figurative sculptures are the evidence of careful observation, capturing moments of casual conversation, close attention, and the distraction that comes with hours spent watching the action on the field.  We see the figures and light shift, signaling the passing of time, not just on the field, but for each season in each life.

To see more of Klara Glosova‘s work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website and the website of her representing gallery, Bryan Ohno Gallery.

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Soft Geometry. Ruth Hiller

It feels like such a hard world these days, doesn’t it?  It can be a challenge to find a bit of softness.  Colorado artist Ruth Hiller juxtaposes industrially crafted plywood with brightly colored organic beeswax, creating a happy softness among the hard edges.

Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Ruth Hiller | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

 

I love the kind of California-surfer-cool vibe to these.  The summery colors against the wood grain have a mod, beach house feel.  The graphic nature also seems to nod to visual identifiers like signs and flags.  Whatever wave she is riding, sign me up!

To see more of Ruth Hiller‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website and Facebook page.

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Splendor in the Glass. Amber Cowan

I have a soft spot for vintage pressed glass.  My grandmother had tons and in a few boxes in storage somewhere, I have my own collection of milk glass.  So when I spotted the work of Philadelphia artist Amber Cowan, I was immediately in love.

Amber Cowan | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #glass #contemporaryart Amber Cowan | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #glass #contemporaryart Amber Cowan | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #glass #contemporaryart Amber Cowan | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #glass #contemporaryart Amber Cowan | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #glass #contemporaryart

Cowan creates her magical sculptures from a process of flameworking, blowing, and hot-sculpting thrifted American pressed glass.  The most amazing form of creative upcycling!  With its tightly bunched flora and peek-a-boo fauna, Cowan’s work takes on a wonderfully gothic, fairy tail-like effect, like intricate illustrations come to life.

To see more of Amber Cowan‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

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Shapes Surrounding. Joshua Abarbanel

Whenever Mr. F and I go hiking or beach walking, I get a sore neck.  That might seem a bit weird, but it’s really not when you learn that I spend a lot of time looking down.  Not just because of my klutzy tendencies, but because of all the amazing shapes and patterns to be found beneath our feet.  California artist Joshua Abarbanel fashions incredible wood sculptures inspired by nature’s forms and shapes.

Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart Joshua Abarbanel | artsy forager #art #artists #sculpture #contemporaryart

 

Abarbanel uses a mix of technology, mechanical tools, and handiwork to craft these amazing sculptures.  The way all the elements fit together seems perfectly in sync, a delicate balance like the life on a coral reef or gears of a clock.

To see more of the work of Joshua Abarbanel, please visit his website.  His work can currently be seen at Hinge Parallel in Culver City, CA.

All images are via the artist’s website.

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Broken: Sandra Shashou

I’ve always been drawn to the imperfect.. the broken shell on the beach, the scratched and worn kitchen table.  There is something poetic in the brokenness.  In her sculptural series Broken, London artist Sandra Shashou intentionally breaks beautiful pieces of fine china, the broken pieces becoming a part of a new whole.

Shashou_Gold and pink Shashou_Orange and gold Shashou_Edwardian vintage Shashou_White and gold Shashou_Kobalt and Gold

 

It must be at once heartbreaking and cathartic to smash these lovely things to pieces!  But perfection isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be ( pun intended, ha! ).  Instead of collecting dust in a china cabinet or waiting for a buyer in an antique shop, these pieces are given not just a second chance, but are transformed into a completely new object.  May we all be so lucky!

To see more of Sandra Shashou‘s work, please visit her website.

Images via the artist’s website and Saatchi Online portfolio.

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