Artsy Abroad. The Bottega Tours Venice.

Hiya, Artsies!  Artist Candice Smith Corby recently took a group of students on a little artsy tour of Venice and is here to share her experience with you!  I’ll be checking in and letting you know what’s been happening in my world soon, I promise.  Without further adieu, here’s Candice!

I was delighted when asked to do a guest post for the Artsy Abroad column!

Recently, my colleague, Bill Pettit, and I led a cultural and artistic tour in Venice, Italy. We’ve been partnering up over the last couple of years through our arts collective, The Bottega, to offer fresco painting in Italy for students, as well as collaborate on projects that revolve around our shared interest in pigment and material origins. With the sea being so influential, we decided that watercolor painting and the cuisine of the Veneto region would be ideal themes for our workshop in Venice. It was also a great opportunity for us to share what we love- art, travel and good food!

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

Venice or La Serenissima as it is lovingly known, is magical and undoubtedly one of the most serene cities in the world. There are no cars on the island and you quickly become accustomed to a more humane speed of life than we are normally used to. The pulse of the city, which actually feels much more like a large close-knit town, is dictated by your own heartbeat. Everyone walks, especially Venetians, and even though the Grande Canal is a highway of motorized boat traffic, the hundreds of small interlacing canals are quiet and much less travelled. The combination of silent footsteps, a slower pace, and an ancient city plan with its small-scale architecture, makes it easy to suspend time.

In addition to sampling the local flavor of Venetian dishes and expressing a particular moment through paint, we also wanted to offer an experience beyond a typical tourist’s visit to Venice. Piazza San Marco was certainly on our list but the surprises found around an empty corner or the restaurant where all the gondoliers seemed to be having lunch were our favorite finds.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

We avoided the crowds and chose canals with their small bridges to sit and paint the light as it changed across the water’s surface.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

The act of observing with all of your senses while you are painting alfresco can whet your appetite and we enjoyed finding a nearby bàcari for cicchetti and a Spritz to rejuvenate ourselves. [A bàcari is a small wine bar to have cicchetti, which are little plates of yummy food.  A typical drink is the Venetian Spritz- made with prosecco and a splash of Aperol.]

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

Our workshop also allowed us to share our personal research and experiments on historical pigments, which often have direct links to ingredients in the kitchen; such as the way chicken bones can be fire roasted and ground to make a bone white pigment. With the sea nearby, we chose to show how the ink sac from a cuttlefish (or seppia in Italian) has been used for Sepia ink for hundreds of years and is also commonly used as a food colorant. We spent the morning visiting and painting at the famous Rialto markets where we also gathered ingredients for a communal dinner. Later that night, Bill and I made our guests various dishes such as fried anchovies and sardines, octopus salad, and of course Risotto al Nero di Seppia.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

In addition, artist Luca de Gaetano who teaches at Boston University’s Venice studio arts program graciously invited us to spend an afternoon talking about natural pigments including cochineal, verdigris, and saffron, while doing an egg tempera demonstration.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

Our last day was spent visiting a couple of the other islands in the lagoon. Although we ended with Murano, famous for its glass-blowing factories, we began on quiet Torcello. The original inhabitants of Venice settled here and you will find their marvelous Cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta preserved there. It dates from the 6th century with glorious 9th century mosaics that feel oddly medieval and contemporary at the same time. As we all painted in the courtyard, each of us immersed in the pleasure of looking, we were acutely aware of the layered centuries that surrounded us.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

Perhaps because it was our final day together, or because the sunlight was perfectly warm, and perhaps because we all realized how lucky we were, this was the highlight of our tour.  To quote one of our participants–

“I see it as a movie, with disparate characters, a lot of philosophy, wit and humor,…culminating in Torcello, where the meaning of life, destiny, faith, and human interaction at its best was evident in our conversation, silent and vocal communication. What a gift!”

While next year the world famous Biennale will be part of our itinerary, we’ll continue to take you off the beaten track, letting the magic of Venice slow you down to paint a sunrise over the lagoon, listen to un-ending church bells, and discover your own newfound delicacy from the sea.

Artsy Abroad. The Bottega in Venice. | artsy forager #art #travel #venice

Thank you so much, Candice for sharing your Venetian experience!  I don’t know about you, Artsies, but I’m ready to book my 2015 trip this minute!  For more information on The Bottega and next year’s trip, check out The Bottega website and look for updates on their Facebook page.

Images courtesy of The Bottega and Emily Cure.

December Featured Artist. Anna Kincaide.

If you’ve been following the blog for awhile, you may recognize the work of our December Featured Artist.  Not only have I featured the work of Anna Kincaide on the blog several times, but she’s also one of the artists I selected for my Artsy Forager print collection for Mantle Art.

Anna Kincaide | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Anna Kincaide | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Anna Kincaide | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Anna Kincaide | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Anna Kincaide | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

I have always had a fascination with the glamorous era of Cary Grant and his contemporaries, where Anna draws much of the inspiration for her fashion forward paintings. The way she isolates her figures against color-blocked or patterned backgrounds kind of make them feel like they have been lifted from the silver screen or fashion magazine and found themselves in the midst of a painting.  Which, if you think about it, is not such a bad place to be!

To see more of Anna Kincaide‘s work, please visit her website.  Her prints in my Mantle Art collection are perfect for gift giving, too– you can even choose a custom frame right on their site!  Easy peasy.  Follow along on Artsy Forager social media to see more of Anna’s work all December long!

All images are via the artist’s website.

November Featured Artist. Marsha Boston.

November might just be my favorite month.. shhh, don’t tell October!  So it’s only fitting to give you one of my favorite artists as the Featured Artist for the month of November!  California artist Marsha Boston is a painter after my own heart, exploring the wonders of plant life and how we might live in harmony with our botanical neighbors.

Marsha Boston | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marsha Boston | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marsha Boston | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marsha Boston | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Marsha Boston | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

A while back, Mr. F and I listened to a fascinating BBC story on the concept of “rewilding“.  Listening to these experts talk about the positive changes that occur when once developed land is allowed to return to its wild state definitely led to some interesting conversation and thoughts about how we impact our environment now and how we might in the future.  Mr. F observed what an incredible amount of hubris it takes on the part of man to think he can do better than nature. Marsha’s work is often focused on how we define our relationship to nature.  Are we here to serve or be served?

To see more of Marsha Boston‘s work, please visit her website.  Her beautiful paintings will grace the Artsy Forager Facebook cover and I’ll be sharing more of Marsha’s work on other Artsy Forager social media all month long.  Make sure you’re following along!

All images are via the artist’s website.

Artsy Abroad. In Situ: Spiral Jetty and the Utah Salt Flats.

by Stephanie Clark

The scale of the Spiral Jetty tends to fluctuate depending on where the viewer happens
to be. Size determines an object, but scale determines art. A crack in the wall if viewed
in terms of scale, not size, could be called the Grand Canyon. A room could be made to
take on the immensity of the solar system. Scale depends on one’s capacity to be
conscious of the actualities of perception.

From the center of the Spiral Jetty
North—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
North by East—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Northeast by North—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Northeast by East—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
East by North—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
East—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
East by South—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Southeast by East—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Southeast by South—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
South by East—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
South—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
South by West—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Southwest by South—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Southwest by West—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
West by South—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
West—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
West by North—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Northwest by West—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
Northwest by North—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water
North by West—Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water

-The Spiral Jetty (Arts of the Environment, edited by
Gyorgy Kepes, 1972) as written by Robert Smithson from
The Writings of Robert Smithson. Edited by Nancy Holt,
1979

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

After driving from New Mexico to Colorado, and through the night into Utah, the morning was clear as we made our way through golden fields. Hawks flew overhead, landing on fence posts. We drove onward onto graveled dirt roads, stopping the car to run on these roads and stretch our legs and arms in the expanse surrounding us. The September sky was crisp and clean.

We drove on as the red road curved.

We saw no one.

Finally, in the distance a blueish gray line paralleled a pink line below it. Spiral Jetty was just below these visible lines. It appeared small from our aerial view. We parked and the three of us parted ways, bounding up the hill above, or toward the salt flats below. Everything was bright as the sun radiated off of the films of salt that covered the land.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

“Mud, salt crystals, rocks, water”, as Robert Smithson described in his 1972 essay on Spiral Jetty, were in every direction.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

Our dog ran far into the distance. A red dot running as if she were born to, yet at some point, the smell of salt became noxious for her senses. The salt was much too potent for her keen sense of smell. She came sprinting back to me and we walked Spiral Jetty together slowly and calculated.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

Darting back up the hillside, I set up my studio on the rocks near the car—which provided some minimal shade from the glaring sun. Here I painted.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

Figures appeared on the salt flats below. Appearing to be hiking in from another field. After some time three travelers appeared also via car. One man and two women, all from Belgium were curious about us. They were impressed by how very much our dog appeared to “enjoy art” and upon us asking revealed that they were taking a land art tour of the Southwest. I mentioned Erin Hogan’s book, Spiral Jetta, which was a resource for us as we planned our trip to Spiral Jetty and previously to Marfa, Texas.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

After being in the bright sun and intense heat from early morning until mid-afternoon we decided to move on. The colors of the salt flats had shifted displaying more pinks and washed out Payne’s grays than the deep silvers and slate blues of the morning.

We moved on.

Artsy Abroad. Artist Stephanie Clark shares her experience painting at Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty | artsy forager #art #artists #spiraljetty #environmentalart

Thank you so much, Stephanie, for sharing your experience of painting at Spiral Jetty!  I think I’ll start planning my own land art tour ASAP!

Images by Stephanie Clark and Andrew Yost.

October Featured Artist. Raquel Edwards.

I’m sure you didn’t think I’d be back so soon and this is just a momentary pop-in.  But I couldn’t let a new month dawn without bringing you a new Featured Artist!  When first we met October Featured Artist, Raquel Edwards, it was almost exactly three years ago and she was exploring beauty through the lens of a camera rather than a canvas.

Raquel Edwards | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Raquel Edwards | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Raquel Edwards | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Raquel Edwards | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryartRaquel Edwards | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

Artists are driven by the need to explore and express and Raquel is no exception.  Switching from photography to painting, she’s now discovering new techniques and means of visualization digging into the nature of cognition.  The shapes she presents are somewhat familiar, yet just foreign enough that we can draw our own conclusions as to the meaning of their presence.

To see more of Raquel Edwards’ work, please visit her website.  One of her gorgeous encaustic paintings is gracing the Artsy Forager Facebook page all month long and I’ll be sharing favorites of Raquel’s work as often as I can on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & Pinterest.

All images are via the artist’s website.

This Artsy Life. A Momentary Farewell.

This morning I awoke before the sun in San Francisco and boarded a one-way flight bound for my Florida home.  I’ve shared previously about my mom’s cancer diagnosis and the battle is taking its toll on her.  She needs me more than this blog does, so I will be away for a while.

This Artsy Life | artsy forager This painting is one in a series of small pieces I did for my mom while we were separated and she began chemo treatments for Stage 3C Ovarian Cancer. #art #artists #healingart #cancer

I’m so grateful to each of you who have taken on the role of caregiver for a parent and have reached out to me and told me what a cherished and important time it became. Those stories give me strength and courage to know that I am not the first to walk this line, nor will I be the last. I hope that when this chapter is complete, I can be a help and hope to someone else at the beginning of this journey.

This Artsy Life | artsy forager This painting is one in a series of small pieces I did for my mom while we were separated and she began chemo treatments for Stage 3C Ovarian Cancer. #art #artists #healingart #cancer

I’m going to miss blogging and sharing artists with you every day, but this is just a temporary break and I hope to be able to use this time not only to focus on my mom, but to dive deeper into painting ( having Mr. F ship my paints to Florida! ) and work through my feelings by creating. The two paintings above are little studies I’ve done for my mom since she began chemo.  Inspired by advice from M.A. Tateishi, I wanted her to know how much she was on my mind and heart and provide her with something tangible to hold and connect with me while we were on opposite coasts. Maybe when we are together I can convince her to paint with me!

I’ll be checking in when I can here and on the Artsy Forager social media channels.  If you’re on Instagram, I’ll see you there!  Thank you for all of your thoughts and prayers, dear Artsies.  I’ll see you again soon.

 

Overwhelming Landscapes. Paco Pomet.

Being out in the woods or hiking in the mountains can be an intimidating experience.  It is when we are in the enormity of the wilderness that we realize how very small and insignificant we are.   These paintings by Spanish artist Paco Pomet seem to have that same feeling of being in the midst of an overwhelming landscape.

Paco Pomet | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Paco Pomet | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Paco Pomet | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Paco Pomet | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Paco Pomet | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

 

Mountains take over offices and pink clouds engulf a riverscape as Pomet uses carefully placed color to emphasize the distinction between man and panorama.  Each painting has an incredible sense of scope and depth, so that the feeling of the immensity of the earth is readily apparent.

To see more of Paco Pomet‘s work, please visit his website.

All images are via the artist’s website.  Artist found via The Artful Desperado.

A Little Night Magic. Sarah Shaw.

In our travels, Mr. F and I have seen some beautiful sights from the highway.  During our time in Yosemite, we often found ourselves driving through the park from the valley up to our campground after nightfall.  There was something that completely enchanted me about the mountains silhouetted against the night sky and the way the headlights lit up the trees to a surprisingly bright green.  In these paintings from her Roads and Carousel series, UK artist Sarah Shaw captures that magic to be found in the night.

Sarah Shaw | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #abstractart #contemporaryart Sarah Shaw | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #abstractart #contemporaryart Sarah Shaw | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #abstractart #contemporaryart Sarah Shaw | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #abstractart #contemporaryart Sarah Shaw | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #abstractart #contemporaryart

These paintings seem to glow with that mystical light that happens when the landscape is lit artificially, spotlighting small sections and leaving others to blackness.  How true that seems sometimes in life.. we focus our light, our attention on what is in front of us, the needs of that moment, while the periphery waits in silence for its turn.

To see more of Sarah Shaw‘s work, please visit her website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

Conjured Childhoods. Hannah Lewis Davies.

Isn’t it funny how selective our memories of childhood can be?  How some moments seem so vivid while others are barely recalled?  UK artist Hannah Lewis Davies‘ paintings explore those fleeting memories as well as the imaginary worlds we create in childhood.

Hannah Lewis Davies | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Hannah Lewis Davies | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Hannah Lewis Davies | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Hannah Lewis Davies | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart Hannah Lewis Davies | artsy forager #art #artists #paintings #contemporaryart

I have a feeling that being with my mom will bring back a lot of childhood memories.  It’s funny that what I remember most about my mom from childhood aren’t necessarily memories of her specifically, though she was a constant, caring presence, but it’s more her things.  I remember being fascinated with her jewelry and shoes.  It was the 70s and my mom had amazing taste in shoes!  Wedges to die for!  And there were the books and clothes, especially one filmy peignoir that I would wear and imagine myself as a princess or an actress accepting the Academy Award.  Without even realizing it, she set up a world that opened up my imagination– one where I could discover and reinvent myself, surround myself with beauty, go on adventures.  As an adult, I’m still striving to do all those things, but she planted the seed.

To see more of Hannah Lewis Davies‘ work, please visit her website.

All images via the artist’s website.  Artist found via Saatchi Online.

Piles of Pieces. M Michael Smith.

I like to think of life like a puzzle.  We are given all these disjointed bits yet they fit together in a way that is unique to our own personality and experience.  These collages by Cincinnati artist M Michael Smith remind me that though we may draw from similar backgrounds, our piles of pieces are only our own.

M Michael Smith | artsy forager #art #artists #collage #contemporaryart M Michael Smith | artsy forager #art #artists #collage #contemporaryart M Michael Smith | artsy forager #art #artists #collage #contemporaryart M Michael Smith | artsy forager #art #artists #collage #contemporaryart M Michael Smith | artsy forager #art #artists #collage #contemporaryart

 

As we grow and mature, we add to our “piles” and though the pieces being added might be similar to others’, our pile is particular to us.  That piece that peeks out from the bottom of your pile, significant, but only barely, maybe at the top and center of my heap.  In his artist statement, M Michael Smith reveals that touch is central to his work.  I’m of course giving my own interpretation, seeing these collages as symbols not of physical touch but of how our lives are touched and molded by experience.

To see more of M Michael Smith‘s work, please visit his website.

All images are via the artist’s website.

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